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The survey was conducted from 09/28/2021 to 10/14/2021, 7745 respondents gave complete answers.
Key Findings
I. Current place of work.
What keeps employees in their current job?
The main retaining factor is the team (48%), work responsibilities are in second place (41%). Only a third of the respondents are satisfied with the company, salary or management. A high percentage of working applicants are not satisfied with any of the above (16%).

There are gender differences. Male respondents rated all aspects of the current work more highly, the percentage of women's responses is lower.

By age. The largest percentage of answers “does not suit anything at the current place of work” in the groups of respondents aged 18-24 (17%) and 55+ (18%). The same age groups also have the highest percentage of answers about a good team at work.


By profession. Less than others are satisfied with the current job responsibilities of specialists in the field of procurement, HR, top management, and administrative staff. And the working staff, logistics, delivery, drivers, administrative employees are more often dissatisfied with the salary they receive.

By position. It is expected that managers are more satisfied with their salary than ordinary employees. But only 30% of executives noted that they are satisfied with the management of the company and the company itself (33%).

Labor market pandemic. New facets
Many people think about changing jobs.
76% of respondents are actively looking for work (more than 60% of this group of respondents were working at the time of the survey). 21% are only thinking about looking for a new job, but are not taking any action.

There are gender differences. Men are more likely to actively seek, while women are thinking about changing jobs but are slow to openly seek.

More often think about finding a new job (but have not yet switched to an active search) applicants for the "golden" career age of 35-44 years.

25% of respondents from working personnel, raw materials mining, construction, logistics, HR, executives are also thinking about changing jobs.

Labor market pandemic. New facets
II. Jobs in the labor market.
What do candidates not like?
The second block of questions was devoted to the quality of vacancies that respondents encounter when looking for a job.

In the top answers are “companies do not review resumes and do not invite for interviews” (60% of answers) and “low salary in vacancies” (36%).

And, if this can be partially explained by the fact that many large companies use automated systems for processing responses, and the bulk of vacancies in the labor market are line vacancies with low salaries, which is difficult to fix, then other answers of respondents can be useful for companies of all sizes.

• 30% of applicants point out that the fact that the salary in the vacancies is not indicated at all is a hindrance (that is, the candidate may not have enough motive to respond).
• 27% of respondents noted an even more important aspect of open communication in the labor market – “it is not clear from the job description what the employer wants”, “there is little information or bad reviews about the company”.
• 12% of respondents are not satisfied with working only in the office or full time. The specifics of the current moment, when the share of offers for remote work, part time or part-time work is growing, the employer, limited only by the format of work in the office and offline, may lose in the competition for candidates.
• 10% - compulsory vaccination requirement. The block of answers related to the personal concerns of applicants deserves special attention.
• 27% are not sure that they have the necessary skills, 19% are afraid of rejection due to age. Another result that surprised us, which we added as a low-priority hypothesis, scored 7% of respondents' answers - "didn't like the manager at the interview." It is also an interesting stage in the candidate's journey, where potential employees may be lost due to the characteristics of the hiring manager at the interview.
Labor market pandemic. New facets
We received over 500 comments from survey participants in the free comment box. Such a volume of answers is rare, it seems that people are boiling over. It was often written that vacancies offer one thing, in fact another (salary, schedule, duties, employment features), they are looking for one person for triple functionality, the selection process is not transparent, the employer is delaying the answer, there is no feedback, many scammers, complex unpaid test buildings, failures due to age and much more.
.
Labor market pandemic. New facets
By age. Young candidates under 18 years old (69% of answers), 45-54 years old (51%) and candidates 55+ (63%) are more likely to be afraid of rejection due to age.

The fact that the employer does not view the response and does not invite to 

interview, everyone complains (from 50 to 63% of respondents from all age groups).

Candidates aged 18-24 (43% of respondents) and 25-34 (31%) are not confident in their skills. This is significantly higher than in the groups of 35-44 years old (19%) and 45-55 years old (12%), although in the hypothesis we assumed a higher percentage of such responses from older ages.

The reason “I didn’t like the manager at the interview” was more often indicated by candidates aged 25-44 (9%). This is an interesting observation in the survey. But a deeper study of the reasons for the refusal of candidates, of course, needs to be done within the company.

Labor market pandemic. New facets
“From the description of the vacancy it is not clear what the employer wants,” representatives of science and education (33%), mass media, IT, marketing and advertising, sales, HoReCa, administrative personnel (27%) more often noted.

III. “What is holding you back from looking for a new job?”
In the third block of the survey, we analyzed the answers of job seekers who are not actively looking for a job, but think about it and/or are dissatisfied with their current job.

Practically all hypotheses of low activity of applicants were confirmed (respondents received answers).

Top 3 answers:

• I am not sure that I will find a better place than the current one (38%),
• fears due to age (24%),
• no strength and resources to find a new job (23%).
Labor market pandemic. New facets
There are interesting gender differences in the responses. Male respondents are more likely to feel uncertain that they will find a job better than the current one (42% of men and 35% of women), they are slightly more afraid of not passing the probationary period and being left without work (18% and 14%) and do not know where to start looking for a job (17 % of men and 15% of women) and are less likely to plan to work for themselves as self-employed or freelance (10% of men and 16% of women).

Also, in the context of the answers of ordinary employees and managers, a clear difference is visible. Ordinary employees are more likely to have fears that they do not have enough strength for new things and resources (26% vs 17% of managers' answers), do not know where to start looking for a job (19% vs 10%), fears that they will not pass the probationary period and be left without a job ( 18% vs 9%) and worries about obsolete skills (17% vs 11%).

The greatest fatigue and lack of energy are noted by representatives of the professional field of medicine, marketing, mass media, IT, HoReCa and HR.

Labor market pandemic. New facets
In summary, we can say that potential and current employees, just like companies, experience stress and difficulties in the current labor market. On the one hand, the market offers a large volume of vacancies, but often the offers of employers and the expectations of candidates are asynchronous.

On the other hand, there is a lack of communication between the parties - it is not always clear for candidates what the employer offers (in terms of duties, salary, career growth, internal atmosphere in the company). Some candidates postpone their job search due to lack of strength and resources to search for a job. Is this a consequence of the second year of the pandemic, a decrease in energy due to post-COVID syndrome, difficulties in earning money amid rising inflation, background distress or a change in professions, an increase in the demand for digital skills? We do not know, or rather, it depends very much on the personality of the specialist, the situation in the industry, city, company, etc.

However, the catchphrase that “people are the new oil” is confirmed with confidence. In order to attract and retain the best candidates and specialists in a competitive market, qualitatively different approaches are needed. Strategic and operational.

At every point of contact with the company, on the candidate's journey - from the announcement of the vacancy, the response to the application, the interview, adaptation and training, the culture of trust and constructive communication, to the separation from the employee - the employer either loses an advantage or gains. The company is changing, so you need to think about the new positioning of the employer brand. Target audiences of candidates are changing – new messages are needed, a different speed of response and transparency. The world and values ​​of people are transforming – is the internal environment in the company changing and does the external candidate know about it?

    The survey was conducted from 09/28/2021 to 10/14/2021, 7745 respondents gave complete answers.
    Key Findings
    I. Current place of work.
    What keeps employees in their current job?
    The main retaining factor is the team (48%), work responsibilities are in second place (41%). Only a third of the respondents are satisfied with the company, salary or management. A high percentage of working applicants are not satisfied with any of the above (16%).

    There are gender differences. Male respondents rated all aspects of the current work more highly, the percentage of women's responses is lower.

    By age. The largest percentage of answers “does not suit anything at the current place of work” in the groups of respondents aged 18-24 (17%) and 55+ (18%). The same age groups also have the highest percentage of answers about a good team at work.


    By profession. Less than others are satisfied with the current job responsibilities of specialists in the field of procurement, HR, top management, and administrative staff. And the working staff, logistics, delivery, drivers, administrative employees are more often dissatisfied with the salary they receive.

    By position. It is expected that managers are more satisfied with their salary than ordinary employees. But only 30% of executives noted that they are satisfied with the management of the company and the company itself (33%).

    Labor market pandemic. New facets
    Many people think about changing jobs.
    76% of respondents are actively looking for work (more than 60% of this group of respondents were working at the time of the survey). 21% are only thinking about looking for a new job, but are not taking any action.

    There are gender differences. Men are more likely to actively seek, while women are thinking about changing jobs but are slow to openly seek.

    More often think about finding a new job (but have not yet switched to an active search) applicants for the "golden" career age of 35-44 years.

    25% of respondents from working personnel, raw materials mining, construction, logistics, HR, executives are also thinking about changing jobs.

    Labor market pandemic. New facets
    II. Jobs in the labor market.
    What do candidates not like?
    The second block of questions was devoted to the quality of vacancies that respondents encounter when looking for a job.

    In the top answers are “companies do not review resumes and do not invite for interviews” (60% of answers) and “low salary in vacancies” (36%).

    And, if this can be partially explained by the fact that many large companies use automated systems for processing responses, and the bulk of vacancies in the labor market are line vacancies with low salaries, which is difficult to fix, then other answers of respondents can be useful for companies of all sizes.

    • 30% of applicants point out that the fact that the salary in the vacancies is not indicated at all is a hindrance (that is, the candidate may not have enough motive to respond).
    • 27% of respondents noted an even more important aspect of open communication in the labor market – “it is not clear from the job description what the employer wants”, “there is little information or bad reviews about the company”.
    • 12% of respondents are not satisfied with working only in the office or full time. The specifics of the current moment, when the share of offers for remote work, part time or part-time work is growing, the employer, limited only by the format of work in the office and offline, may lose in the competition for candidates.
    • 10% - compulsory vaccination requirement. The block of answers related to the personal concerns of applicants deserves special attention.
    • 27% are not sure that they have the necessary skills, 19% are afraid of rejection due to age. Another result that surprised us, which we added as a low-priority hypothesis, scored 7% of respondents' answers - "didn't like the manager at the interview." It is also an interesting stage in the candidate's journey, where potential employees may be lost due to the characteristics of the hiring manager at the interview.
    Labor market pandemic. New facets
    We received over 500 comments from survey participants in the free comment box. Such a volume of answers is rare, it seems that people are boiling over. It was often written that vacancies offer one thing, in fact another (salary, schedule, duties, employment features), they are looking for one person for triple functionality, the selection process is not transparent, the employer is delaying the answer, there is no feedback, many scammers, complex unpaid test buildings, failures due to age and much more.
    .
    Labor market pandemic. New facets
    By age. Young candidates under 18 years old (69% of answers), 45-54 years old (51%) and candidates 55+ (63%) are more likely to be afraid of rejection due to age.

    The fact that the employer does not view the response and does not invite to 

    interview, everyone complains (from 50 to 63% of respondents from all age groups).

    Candidates aged 18-24 (43% of respondents) and 25-34 (31%) are not confident in their skills. This is significantly higher than in the groups of 35-44 years old (19%) and 45-55 years old (12%), although in the hypothesis we assumed a higher percentage of such responses from older ages.

    The reason “I didn’t like the manager at the interview” was more often indicated by candidates aged 25-44 (9%). This is an interesting observation in the survey. But a deeper study of the reasons for the refusal of candidates, of course, needs to be done within the company.

    Labor market pandemic. New facets
    “From the description of the vacancy it is not clear what the employer wants,” representatives of science and education (33%), mass media, IT, marketing and advertising, sales, HoReCa, administrative personnel (27%) more often noted.

    III. “What is holding you back from looking for a new job?”
    In the third block of the survey, we analyzed the answers of job seekers who are not actively looking for a job, but think about it and/or are dissatisfied with their current job.

    Practically all hypotheses of low activity of applicants were confirmed (respondents received answers).

    Top 3 answers:

    • I am not sure that I will find a better place than the current one (38%),
    • fears due to age (24%),
    • no strength and resources to find a new job (23%).
    Labor market pandemic. New facets
    There are interesting gender differences in the responses. Male respondents are more likely to feel uncertain that they will find a job better than the current one (42% of men and 35% of women), they are slightly more afraid of not passing the probationary period and being left without work (18% and 14%) and do not know where to start looking for a job (17 % of men and 15% of women) and are less likely to plan to work for themselves as self-employed or freelance (10% of men and 16% of women).

    Also, in the context of the answers of ordinary employees and managers, a clear difference is visible. Ordinary employees are more likely to have fears that they do not have enough strength for new things and resources (26% vs 17% of managers' answers), do not know where to start looking for a job (19% vs 10%), fears that they will not pass the probationary period and be left without a job ( 18% vs 9%) and worries about obsolete skills (17% vs 11%).

    The greatest fatigue and lack of energy are noted by representatives of the professional field of medicine, marketing, mass media, IT, HoReCa and HR.

    Labor market pandemic. New facets
    In summary, we can say that potential and current employees, just like companies, experience stress and difficulties in the current labor market. On the one hand, the market offers a large volume of vacancies, but often the offers of employers and the expectations of candidates are asynchronous.

    On the other hand, there is a lack of communication between the parties - it is not always clear for candidates what the employer offers (in terms of duties, salary, career growth, internal atmosphere in the company). Some candidates postpone their job search due to lack of strength and resources to search for a job. Is this a consequence of the second year of the pandemic, a decrease in energy due to post-COVID syndrome, difficulties in earning money amid rising inflation, background distress or a change in professions, an increase in the demand for digital skills? We do not know, or rather, it depends very much on the personality of the specialist, the situation in the industry, city, company, etc.

    However, the catchphrase that “people are the new oil” is confirmed with confidence. In order to attract and retain the best candidates and specialists in a competitive market, qualitatively different approaches are needed. Strategic and operational.

    At every point of contact with the company, on the candidate's journey - from the announcement of the vacancy, the response to the application, the interview, adaptation and training, the culture of trust and constructive communication, to the separation from the employee - the employer either loses an advantage or gains. The company is changing, so you need to think about the new positioning of the employer brand. Target audiences of candidates are changing – new messages are needed, a different speed of response and transparency. The world and values ​​of people are transforming – is the internal environment in the company changing and does the external candidate know about it?

     
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